Home » Child, parent, and child welfare practice variables associated with reentry to foster care in Utah. by Navina Forsythe
Child, parent, and child welfare practice variables associated with reentry to foster care in Utah. Navina Forsythe

Child, parent, and child welfare practice variables associated with reentry to foster care in Utah.

Navina Forsythe

Published
ISBN : 9780549678960
NOOKstudy eTextbook
119 pages
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 About the Book 

The purpose of this study was to assess possible predictors to reentry to foster care in the Utah Child Welfare system. Five blocks of child, parent, prior child welfare involvement and reason for entry, child welfare services and practice, andMoreThe purpose of this study was to assess possible predictors to reentry to foster care in the Utah Child Welfare system. Five blocks of child, parent, prior child welfare involvement and reason for entry, child welfare services and practice, and post-discharge services variables extracted from the agencies management information system were included. Four survival analyses were conducted with these variables on samples of children that had exited custody within a 4-year time frame. Analyses were conducted to determine variables significant to reentry within a 12-month and 3- to 4-year time frame, including one child per family versus all children per family, and comparing a 2-year time frame to a subsequent 2-year time frame. Additionally, child welfare case workers were surveyed to gather their perceptions on factors relating to reentry for children exiting custody.-Results indicated that teenage children, American Indian children, children whose parents abuse multiple substances, and children exiting care to run away are among the most likely to reenter foster care. Many practice variables failed to reach significance in predicting reentry- however, survival charts show they may have some impact on reducing reentry. Worker experience also appears to be an important factor in reducing likelihood of reentry. Workers indicated that parental factors, worker experience, and postdischarge services from the community were important in preventing reentry. Implications for practice and policy changes are discussed.